[tags: September 11 Terrorism Essays]

Here's an example introductory paragraph for the essay outlined above:

Just curious, how old are you/what grade are you in? A one/maybe 2 sentence thesis is a tad short... but thats what I was taught early on. A thesis should be about 3 sentences.

Also, no matter what your essay is, analytical, persuasive, or informative, the thesis should always argue a point. If its an informative essay, why should I know this stuff? Have insight.

And as burzvingion said: NEVER USE 1st OR 2nd PERSON!!, unless it is a personal experience. That means no I, you, we, my, mine, etc.

Otherwise, its a nice basic introduction to the "five-by-five". (5 paragraphs with 5 "sentences" per paragraph, although each piece of evidence can be more than 1 sentence)

Interesting, I'm not an English major or anything (in fact, I have a strong dislike for English classes) but I usually score pretty well on essays because of a writing formula I've learned from the the only English teacher I ever liked. It's called the SEXI paragraph. Basically, you write as many SEXI paragraphs as your need, then your conclusion paragraph, then go back and write your opening paragraph and thesis (of course, you could write your thesis and opener first but I like doing it last). Here's how the SEXI paragraph works:

Statement - State your idea or opinion like it was fact. only state one idea that you will flesh out in the rest of the paragraph.
Explanation - Explain your idea as it pertains to the rest of the essay and give reasons why.
eXample - Give an example of something your idea would/could apply to.
Interpretation - Interpret the meaning of your idea (basically good or bad).

I've gotten through some last minute essays really easily with that little formula. Just remember, you can have more than one sentence per letter to get to more than four sentences per paragraph.

1. Tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em.2. Tell 'em.3. Tell 'em what you told 'em.I would like to add something that helped me. When I come to the conclusion part, I reread what I've written and compare to the intro to see whether I said what I said I would say. Nine times out of ten I revise my intro to more closely match my body, then write the conclusion. And then nine times out of ten I rewrite the body because it sounds repetitive or otherwise awkward. Once my mind starts dumping the thoughts out through my fingers, many times the same thoughts pour out a second or third time. These recurrences of the same concept need to be trimmed or reworded to fit in with other new material. Sometimes restating a previous element helps to support (or gain support) from other new material. NEVER introduce new material in the conclusion. Never support material in the conclusion. The conclusion should be a logical follow on to the body. For a one-paragraph example...I am going to show you that one plus one equals two. If I have one cookie and add another cookie to it, I have two cookies. If Jill has one puppy and adds another puppy, she has two puppies. If Dick has one car and adds another car, he has two cars. Therefore, thus, and so on, in every case of one plus one, I have demonstrated that adding one unit to another yields two units of the same type. At this point it would not be appropriate to add a new fact that adding three units of the same time gives a result of 3. It would also be inappropriate to say that adding one cookie to one car gives one car and one cookie but two objects. If these two facts were to be incorporated into the essay, it would greatly increase the scope of the essay. If you were to rewrite this Instructable in the form of an essay, how would you write the introduction and conclusion?

[tags: September 11 Terrorism Essays]

7. The summary paragraph summarizes your essay and is often a reverse of the introductory paragraph. Begin the summary paragraph by quickly restating the principal ideas of your body paragraphs.

A classic format for compositions is the five-paragraph essay

There are many ways to write an essay. Many essays take the form known as the "". In the hamburger essay, the introductory and concluding paragraphs are very similar. The most important information is found in the body paragraphs of the essay. Think of a hamburger: The buns cover the top and the bottom (the introduction and conclusion), and provide a nice covering for the most important part of the meal—the burger.

How to Write a Five Paragraph Essay (with Examples) - wikiHow

Use the detailed lesson plan to learn how to teach the five-paragraph essay.

Following the TTEB method outlined in the Body Paragraph section, forecast all the information that will follow in the rebuttal section and then move point by point through the other positions addressing each one as you go. The outline below, adapted from Seyler's Understanding Argument, is an example of a rebuttal section from a thesis essay.

The Five Paragraph Essay - Flocabulary

Now that you have finished your body paragraphs, you are almost done. You just have your conclusion to do. The conclusion is like your introduction in reverse. Here's how to write it.

1. Print out the conclusion worksheet.

2. Reword your thesis statement.

3. Give the five reasons.

4. Now, brainstorm another quote or anecdote.

5. Type it all into your paper.

REVISION! Here is something that dchal8 added

When I come to the conclusion part, I reread what I've written and compare to the intro to see whether I said what I said I would say. Nine times out of ten I revise my intro to more closely match my body, then write the conclusion. And then nine times out of ten I rewrite the body because it sounds repetitive or otherwise awkward. Once my mind starts dumping the thoughts out through my fingers, many times the same thoughts pour out a second or third time. These recurrences of the same concept need to be trimmed or reworded to fit in with other new material. Sometimes restating a previous element helps to support (or gain support) from other new material.

NEVER introduce new material in the conclusion. Never support material in the conclusion. The conclusion should be a logical follow on to the body. For a one-paragraph example...

I am going to show you that one plus one equals two. If I have one cookie and add another cookie to it, I have two cookies. If Jill has one puppy and adds another puppy, she has two puppies. If Dick has one car and adds another car, he has two cars. Therefore, thus, and so on, in every case of one plus one, I have demonstrated that adding one unit to another yields two units of the same type.

At this point it would not be appropriate to add a new fact that adding three units of the same time gives a result of 3. It would also be inappropriate to say that adding one cookie to one car gives one car and one cookie but two objects. If these two facts were to be incorporated into the essay, it would greatly increase the scope of the essay.


academic dissertation writing 1 Paragraph Essay phd thesis cv service writing ppt

Your introduction is the most important part of your essay. It grabs the attention of your reader. Here's how to type your introduction.

1. Print out the Introduction Worksheet I attached.

2. Skip right down to the brainstorming section. Brainstorm some ideas for the first sentence. Ancedotes, quotes, or statistics would be good here. This would be a great place to use misc. info.

3. Write your fist sentence that you came up with on the line.

4. Write down the five reasons that are your body paragraphs.

5. Now, finish it off with your thesis statement.

CONGRATS! You have an intro. Use that worksheet and make it into the first paragraph of your essay.

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What other kind of information do you think the introduction of an essay should have?","timestamp":44.333},{"id":433,"content":"A topic sentence summarizes the main idea of each paragraph in the body of an essay.